I Before E…Right?

You have probably heard the phrase “I before E.” You may even know the longer version, “I before E except after C.” If you’re really lucky, you learned the compound version, “I before E except after C and when sounding like A.”

So what does all that mean?

I before E

Most English words that have an “ie” combination are spelled with the “i” first.

I Before E

Except after C

Many words where the “ei” comes after the letter C are spelled with the “e” first.

Except After C

Or when sounding like A

When the “ei” in the word is pronounced as an “A,” the “e” before “i” exception applies.

Or When Sounding like A

Additional Exceptions

The rule should really be “I before E except after C and when sounding like A, E or I and when ending in ING and when the ‘c’ makes a ‘sh’ sound and when used in a comparative/superlative and in some compound words and in other random instances when the English language deems the exception necessary.” In this case, a run-on sentence was necessary.

Random Exceptions

Here is some solid advice from one of Brian Regan’s comedy acts about his time in school:

Brian Regan

Good luck, folks.

If you struggle with this or the many other grammar rules and exceptions, seek help through the Contact page at www.unscriptedllc.com.

 

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